Police look to save lives in innovative ways

HARRINGTON — Police Chief Norman Barlow said he is grateful for a different source of funding this week.

Through SLEAF, or the Special Law Enforcement Assistance Fund, the Harrington Police Department has been given enough money to purchase four AED units to assist officers in emergencies.

The automated external defibrillators are designed to offer a shocking blow to a victim in crisis when the pads are placed on their chest, just enough to hopefully bring them back from a cardiac arrest and get medical attention.

The funding comes from money seized through criminal forfeiture actions, he said.

Officials added that the fund is administered through the Department of Justice to enhance the suppression, investigation and prosecution of criminal activity, promote officer safety, facilitate the training of law- enforcement personnel, further public safety, public education and community awareness and improve victim services.

The AEDs cost approximately $6,300, Chief Barlow said.

“We thought it’d be a good thing. Now, it will be readily available for anyone in town, or even out to Felton,” he said.

The key to the new devices? They talk to the user, he added.

“All the officers have to do is follow the instructions. They know CPR. But the prompts help if they ever do forget because they don’t use it often.”

 Corporal School Resource Officer L.B. Stubbs stands with safety patrol members Maycee Collison, Elle Wood and Malachi Moore. Malachi plans on attending the Youth Academy offered by the Harrington Police Department at the end of June. The Journal/Jennifer Antonik

Corporal School Resource Officer L.B. Stubbs stands with safety patrol members Maycee Collison, Elle Wood and Malachi Moore. Malachi plans on attending the Youth Academy offered by the Harrington Police Department at the end of June. The Journal/Jennifer Antonik

First youth police academy

School Resource Officer L.B. Stubbs is looking forward to a new summertime adventure for students in the Lake Forest School District: the first Youth Academy.

Officers in the department will collectively offer support, guidance and police-related training to students aged 11-16 June 27- July 1.

The academy will run from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day and will include lunches and snacks, according to SRO Stubbs.

“We’re looking forward to this opportunity to reach out to kids interested in a career in policing,” he said.

W. T. Chipman student Malachi Moore said he is just as excited.

“I just would like to have the experience to be a leader. I want to stop people from doing bad things,” he said, adding that he has already signed up for the academy.

SRO Stubbs said 32 students have been chosen to participate in this new program.

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