Harrington sees new community policing officer

HARRINGTON – For the first time in Harrington Police Department history, a community policing unit is joining its ranks.

Officer Carl Klotz initially came to Harrington to work as the code enforcement officer in September of 2013, but it didn’t take long for him to rediscover his true passion.

Officer Carl Klotz reads to Lake Forest students after recently joining the Harrington Police Department as its new community policing officer. Special to The Journal

Officer Carl Klotz reads to Lake Forest students after recently joining the Harrington Police Department as its new community policing officer. Special to The Journal

“I was telling myself I didn’t want to be a police officer, but really, I couldn’t stay away. It’s in the blood,” he said.

Before coming to Harrington, he spent seven years working out of the sheriff’s office in Queen Anne’s, MD and another 11 years as a Maryland natural resource police officer.

Police Chief Norman Barlow said he watched Officer Klotz while on duty for the city of Harrington and thought he would be a great fit to round out his force.

“He’s an excellent addition. Carl is a breath of fresh air. He’s always smiling. I think that’s what makes him great at this position,” Chief Barlow said.

The idea of utilizing community policing in Harrington has been a goal for Chief Barlow who brought the topic before the city council just last year with hopes of getting a grant for the added position.

The grant fell through, however, the council voted to approve the position anyway. Adding Officer Klotz to the force completes its 12 officer roster.

“There will be times when the added officer will be needed for normal police work like filling out paperwork. We don’t want him getting rusty on that,” Chief Barlow joked. “But really, we’re going to add to the protection of the city with this position.”

Residents will be able to see Officer Klotz walking around town and engaging residents in conversation, reading to students or leading meetings on concerning topics such as scams and fraud.

His passion lies primarily with youth and the elderly, he added because “they can easily be taken advantage of.”

“I want to try to bring the community together,” he said. “I don’t want to see my mom’s life savings taken away. So I’m happy helping others become aware.”

Chief Barlow said that the benefit to reaching out to the community in ways the department hasn’t had the time or resources for previously is immeasurable.

“You may not know it, but you’ll reach a lot of people. If that one person takes what they learn and share it, imagine the possibilities,” he said.

“We’ll do our best. We just want to be out there in the community to stop the negativity and be part of the solution. We want to be the change.”

You are encouraged to leave relevant comments but engaging in personal attacks, threats, online bullying or commercial spam will not be allowed. All comments should remain within the bounds of fair play and civility. (You can disagree with others courteously, without being disagreeable.) Feel free to express yourself but keep an open mind toward finding value in what others say. To report abuse or spam, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box.
[fbcomments url="" width="375" count="off" num="3"]